Moving dangerous goods

Regulations for transporting dangerous goods by air, sea, road and rail transport

International regulations govern the carriage of dangerous goods by road, rail, inland waterway, sea and air.

International carriage of dangerous goods by road

Regulation is via the European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR).

ADR sets out the requirements for the classification, packaging, labelling and certification of dangerous goods. It also includes specific vehicle and tank requirements and other operational requirements. For example all drivers of vehicles carrying dangerous goods (including those with a gross vehicle weight of 3.5 tonnes or less) must have an ADR training certificate. The Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment Regulations 2009 (as amended) apply ADR in Great Britain - England, Wales and Scotland the Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2010 apply ADR in Northern Ireland.

Read about carrying dangerous goods on the Health & Safety Executive for Northern Ireland website.

Carriage by rail

The carriage of dangerous goods by rail is governed by Appendix C of the Convention Covering International Carriage by Rail - International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Rail. The Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment Regulations 2009 (as amended) apply in Great Britain.

Transport by inland waterway

In the European Union, the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Inland Navigation (ADN) came into force on 28 February 2009. ADN only applies in the UK in relation to the training and examination system for safety advisers and the connected issuing and renewal of vocational training certificates. It does not apply to the carriage of dangerous goods by inland waterways in the UK given that there is no physical connection between them and European inland waterways.

Transport by sea

The International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) code provides guidance on transporting dangerous goods by sea. Find information about the IMDG code on the International Maritime Organization (IMO) website.

The IMDG code is used by operators transporting dangerous goods on journeys involving a sea crossing. This includes ferry services. In the UK, the Merchant Shipping (Dangerous Goods and Marine Pollutant) Regulations 1997 and the Dangerous Substances in Harbour Areas Regulations (Northern Ireland) 1991 also apply. Read about dangerous goods on the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) website.

Transport by air

The International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Technical Instructions are an internationally agreed set of provisions governing the requirements for transporting dangerous goods by air. The International Air Transport Association (IATA) publishes the Dangerous Goods Regulations in accordance with the ICAO technical instructions.

Dangerous goods training is a mandatory requirement for anyone involved in the transport of dangerous goods by air. You can read more about dangerous goods training on the CAA website.

Find out about dangerous goods and safety worldwide on the IATA website.

Some airlines and countries have their own derogations, known as State and Operator Variations. You should check in the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations for more information.

     

    Developed with:

    British International Freight Association