Issue the correct periods of notice

Contractual and statutory notice periods

An employee who has worked for a company continuously for one month or more must receive notice of dismissal/redundancy.

An employee who has worked for a company continuously for one month or more must give notice of their intention to leave.

These notice periods must be included in a written statement of employment particulars which must be issued to your employee within two months of them starting work.

You can also find guidance on preparing a written statement of main terms and conditions of employment on the Labour Relations Agency (LRA) website.

The minimum legal notice period to be given by an employer is:

  • one week's notice if the employee has been employed by the employer continuously for one month or more, but for less than two years
  • two weeks' notice if the employee has been employed by the employer continuously for two years, and one additional week's notice for each further complete year of continuous employment, up to a maximum of 12 weeks

An employer can include longer periods of notice in the employment contract.

Note that if you plan to make 20 or more employees redundant special conditions apply. See our guide on redundancy: the options.

The minimum statutory notice period which must be given by an employee is at least one week's notice if employed continuously for one month or more by that employer. This minimum is unaffected by longer service.

Minimum notice does not apply to casual workers, independent contractors or freelance agents - see our guide on employment status.

Unless a contract states otherwise, notice can be given on any day. The notice period runs from the start of the day after the day on which notice was given. So if a week's notice is given on a Monday, the period of notice will begin on the Tuesday and expire at the end of the following Monday.

Some contracts of employment contain special terms about notice, eg in contracts of employees who have access to information that you wish to protect from a competitor. See our guide on workers leaving: the basics.

     

    Developed with:

    Department for Business, Innovation & Skills

    The Department for Employment and Learning

    Labour Relations Agency